Category: Government & Religion

Awakening to the End of the SBC

By Dr. James Willingham

All that has taken place on the nation level, the approval of homosexual unions as marriage, political correctness (which means no more free speech, etc.), the fines and law suits against Christians for their views on marriage, is but the precursor of things to come.  The end of jobs by computerization, automation, and robotics along with their removal to other nations for cheaper labor is also the indicator of a planned effort to bring down religion as a key factor in this land, any religion, except that which approves of the present PC views and practices.  And then there are the efforts of SBC leaders (so-called) who are supposedly trying to save the SBC mission programs by getting rid of the DOMs on the local level, followed by the state conventions, and after that the SBC (an expense, you know).  The result will be and is on the way to becoming the end of the programs for missionaries, the largest in history. Continue reading

Awakening to Corporate Enmity

By Dr. James Willingham

It is obvious that the  corporations are behind or a significant factor in the PC movement.  Just consider their opposition to any law, local, state, or otherwise that seeks to restore the moral standards concerning marriage and other concerns (i.e. the ten commandments, the Bible in public schools, etc.). The opposition of corporations to the laws for marriage of man to a woman, etc., as in Indiana and Ohio must be noted.  The same happened in North Carolina.  One of the officials of IBM had a front page article in the local Durham paper opposing some law that affirmed the religious rights of believers and opposing the marriage of homosexuals along with other forms of the sexual revolution.  I dare say IBM hardly has room to talk on such venue.

Just consider the book, IBM and the Holocaust by Edwin Black, documents the 12 years in which IBM provided their punch card  computers to the Nazis in Germany which enabled the latter to identify, round-up, imprison, and exterminate a vast multitude of Jews and other people in the various countries of Europe. Continue reading

Awakening to Second Class Citizenship

By Dr. James Willingham

Awakening to Second Class Citizenship will come as a shock to Christians and members of other faiths which do not buy the current requirements of political correctness.  Having studied Black History for many years, I can say that segregation and slavery were at their best feeble representations of little good and at their worst were horrors likened unto the place of eternal torment.  Years ago Blacks were required to walk out  into the streets, giving Whites the sidewalks.  And then there were executions of Blacks without a trial or, if there was one, it was a farce in many cases.  A White lady in Orangeburg, South Carolina summed it up as follows, “Mr. Willingham, when I knew that integration was going to occur, I chose to go teach in a Black primary school.  When I found out what segregation had done to the personalities of those little Black children, I cried.”

If the Supreme Court of the U.S. makes the decisions that favor the gay community they will come after all of our churches, our jobs, etc.  Consider what happened to the man in Oregon who owned a bakery and had children.  His bakery is closed.  At last account he was working as garbage collector, and the state was still hounding for the rest of the fine, while the people for whom he refused to do their wedding (due to their homosexuality) are also seeking the money which the court ruled he must pay them. Continue reading

Answers in Genesis files lawsuit against Ky.

Baptist PressPETERSBURG, Ky. (BP) — Answers in Genesis is suing the government of Kentucky for alleged discrimination in refusing to extend a sales tax rebate incentive program to the Ark Encounter theme park the apologetics ministry is building in northern Kentucky.

The state’s decision to deny the tax incentive based on AiG’s status as a religious organization is against the law and violates legal precedent, the lawsuit asserts.

“The state was so insistent on treating our religious entity as a second-class citizen that we were simply left with no alternative but to proceed to court,” AiG president Ken Ham said. “This is the latest example of increasing government hostility towards religion in America, and it’s certainly among the most blatant. Our organization spent many months attempting to reason with state officials so that this lawsuit would not be necessary.”

via Answers in Genesis files lawsuit against Ky..

AiG to File Discrimination Suit against Kentucky | Answers in Genesis

answers-in-genesis-logoLawsuit to defend religious freedom explained in new video

by Mark Looy on February 3, 2015

Note: This article is slightly adapted from a news release being sent to the national media today. The release and this web article provide a link to a video of AiG President Ken Ham interviewing attorney Mike Johnson about the religious freedom lawsuit—watch the video at the link above.

Answers in Genesis (AiG), developer of the Ark Encounter theme park in Northern Kentucky, confirmed today it is filing a federal lawsuit against state officials for denying the park participation in the state’s tax rebate incentive program. Although the program is available to all qualifying tourist attractions seeking to build in the state, AiG’s application was rejected solely because of the religious identity and message of AiG. The lawsuit explains how this action by Kentucky officials, including Gov. Steve Beshear, violates federal and state law and amounts to unlawful viewpoint discrimination.

via AiG to File Discrimination Suit against Kentucky | Answers in Genesis.

Religion and Politics by Russell Moore | Reformed Theology Articles at Ligonier.org

Russell Mooreby Russell Moore

Tabletalk: How did you come to pursue a career as a systematic theologian and Christian ethicist?

Russell Moore: I felt a call to ministry early on and preached my first sermon at my home church in Biloxi, Miss., when I was twelve. I then drifted from that calling toward a career in politics. When I was working on Capitol Hill as a very young man, I picked up in the Library of Congress a copy of a Free Will Baptist manual on weddings, funerals, and so forth. After I returned home I wondered, “Why did I want this?” The Lord used that to rekindle my sense of His call to ministry. I never imagined how God would merge these callings together.

via Religion and Politics by Russell Moore | Reformed Theology Articles at Ligonier.org.

The Supreme Court and Same-Sex Marriage: Why This Matters for the Church | Moore to the Point

Russell Moore

Russell Moore

The Supreme Court announced today that they are taking cases on whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. Effectively, this means that the highest court in the land will decide, this year, whether marriage, as defined for thousands of years, will exist in our country any longer. Here’s what we should keep in mind.

First of all, this is not something we should shrug off. Marriage isn’t merely a matter of personal import or private behavior. States recognize marriage for a reason, and that reason is that sexuality between a man and a woman can, and often does, result in children. The state has an interest in seeing to it that, wherever possible, every child has both a mother and a father. The state doesn’t create this reality. It merely recognizes it, and attempts to hold husbands and wives, fathers and mothers, accountable to their vows and to their responsibilities. In every aspect of the Sexual Revolution, from the divorce culture to cohabitation to casual sex to the abortion revolution, children have borne the burden. Continue reading →

Religious Liberty vs. Erotic Liberty — Religious Liberty is Losing | AlbertMohler.com

Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler

Barely five days after The New York Times ran a major news article on the firing of Atlanta’s fire chief for his views on homosexuality, a major Times opinion writer declared that religious liberty is a fine thing, so long as it is restricted to “pews, homes, and hearts” — far from public consequence.

The firing of Kelvin Cochran as chief of Atlanta’s Fire Rescue Department came after the city’s major, Kasim Reed, determined that the chief could not effectively manage the department after he had written a book in which he cited Scripture in defining homosexuality as a sin. Continue reading →

Teach the Uncompromised Truth of Genesis in Church | Answers in Genesis

answers-in-genesis-logoThis month, the pastor of one of the largest churches in Northern Kentucky (and close to our Creation Museum) is conducting a teaching series going through Genesis 1–11 for the congregation. This is the same church that will be hosting our annual Mega Conference, June 24–27. I was present at the service when Pastor Corey Abney1 (the lead pastor) introduced the Genesis series to the congregation. I thought his introduction was excellent (watch it at the video link below), and it could be used to challenge pastors, Bible teachers, and others to consider teaching through Genesis 1–11. We live in an age when the authority of God’s Word has come under attack, particularly the first book of the Bible. We also need to equip this current generation of young people to defend the Christian faith against the secular attacks of our day.

I encourage you to watch Pastor Abney’s short but powerful introduction to his teaching series on Genesis 1–11. I pray many more Christian leaders will be challenged and inspired to stand on God’s Word beginning in Genesis. Continue reading →

Arguments on TX abortion regulations bill heard | Baptist Press

Baptist PressNEW ORLEANS (BP) — In what could be a precedent-setting case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit heard arguments in Whole Woman’s Health v. Lakey, Jan. 7, part of the ongoing legal challenges contesting the 2013 Texas abortion regulations law, which observers agree will end up at the U.S. Supreme Court.

“Texas, in many cases, will be a case of first impressions,” Denise Burke, vice president of legal affairs for Americans United for Life, said.

But it wasn’t the first time the appellate court heard arguments against House Bill 2, an omnibus piece of legislation establishing strict standards of operation for Texas abortion providers. In 2013 the court overturned a ruling by federal court Judge Lee Yeakel. But in this latest lawsuit — in which two provisions, again, were declared unconstitutional by Yeakel — Stephanie Toti, senior counsel for the Center for Reproductive Rights, argued HB 2 simply targets abortion clinics for closure with the “imposition of burdensome requirements.” Continue reading →

America awaits justices’ action on same-sex marriage | Baptist Press

Baptist PressWASHINGTON (BP) — The wait for the U.S. Supreme Court to announce it is ready to provide a verdict on same-sex marriage may be near an end.

Then again, it may not.

The justices are scheduled to meet in a private conference Jan. 9, when they will consider appeals of lower-court decisions in favor of states’ rights to limit marriage to heterosexual couples. The high court could decide to grant review in one or both cases in this term.

If the Supreme Court rules on the issue this term, gay marriage could be legal throughout the country by the time it adjourns this summer. Or states could maintain their authority historically to define marriage as only between a man and a woman. Continue reading →

Decency, Pluralism, and the Christian Response to Charlie Hebdo | Andrew T. Walker

Andrew WalkerLast night, The Weekly Standard tweeted “Print Free or Die” with a picture of the prophet Muhammed, whose physical iconography is the purported reason that the terrorist attacks were carried out in the first place.

Always willing to play the part of social media provocateur, I readied myself to re-tweet that image myself, ready to join in the chorus of those wishing to thumb their nose in an act of First Amendment defiance toward the offended party. As a liberty-loving conservative, I believe one hundred percent in the free exchange of offense. The condition of freedom enlists the possibility, and perhaps requires, that all shall be ready to be offended. Continue reading →

Theological Extremism in a Secular Age | AlbertMohler.com

Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler

This is an edited transcript of The Briefing podcast from early Thursday morning, January 8, 2015.

The war on terror took on a savage new face yesterday when two gunmen entered the headquarters of a French satirical newspaper known as Charlie Hebdo and opened fire, killing 12 people—10 people connected with the newspaper and two police officers.

The Washington Post reported this morning, “France’s deadliest terrorist attack in modern memory unfolded with chilling precision here Wednesday as gunmen speaking fluent French burst into a satirical newspaper’s weekly staff meeting and raked the room with bullets, leaving behind what one witness described as ‘absolute carnage.’” Continue reading →

Racial Reconciliation: Why Most Whites Just Don’t Get it

by Ken Hamrick

There’s something insincere about any repentant admission that says, “Yes, I’m guilty—and so are you.” I do not admit to being a racist, and neither do I think most Americans—white or otherwise—are. Many are racists, but most—or even, all? Contrary to the popular Evangelical party line these days, that cannot be established. It is not enough to point out that racism is sin, and as such, it comes from the fall of man, which affects us all. All are sinners, but not all are racists.

Some good Christian black leader, whose article I’ve since lost track of, has explained that black people view things from a racial/ethnic solidarity—that when one is unjustly treated, all feel the pain. This, I think, illuminates the differences in thinking and explains why most white people just don’t get it when it comes to racial reconciliation. Continue reading

Racial justice and the gospel | ERLC.COM

Russell Moore

Russell Moore

On the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act this year, I was reminded of one of my favorite pictures, which sits on a shelf in my office. It’s a photograph of a line of civil rights workers—in the heat of the Jim Crow era. They’re standing shoulder-to-shoulder, each of them bearing a sign. The sign reads, simply: “I Am a Man.”

I love that picture because it sums up precisely the issue at that time, and at every time. The struggle for civil rights for African-Americans in this country wasn’t simply a “political” question. It wasn’t merely the question of, as Martin Luther King Jr. put it from before the Lincoln Memorial, the unfulfilled promises of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution (although it was nothing less than that). At its root, Jim Crow (and the spirit of Jim Crow, still alive and sinister) is about theology. It’s about the question of the “Godness” of God and the humanness of humanity. Continue reading →

Our Battle Against Religious Persecution Is Floun… | Christianity Today

Christianity TodayRep. Frank Wolf, human rights champion, calls on evangelicals to intensify the fight for religious liberty.
Interview by Timothy C. Morgan/ January 6, 2015

After 34 years in Congress, Frank Wolf, the renowned gadfly for human rights and religious liberty, retires in January. But this 75-year-old won’t be browsing Golfsmith for clubs. He’s more likely to fly back to East Africa, where witnessing severe famine in Ethiopia changed the course of his life in the early 1980s.

As co-chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, Wolf has traveled the world’s hot spots; adopted Gao Zhisheng, the dissident lawyer from China; criticized the State Department’s inattention to human rights; and fought to end to the genocide in Darfur, Sudan. Continue reading →

A Cop with a Pastor’s Heart | PARSE | ERLC.COM

Leadership JournalAn interview with Marcos Miranda about slain New York City police officer, Rafael Ramos / Daniel Darling

The brazen murders of two New York City police officers, Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, on December 20, stunned the nation and cast a pall over the Christmas season. Since the shooting details have emerged about the lives of the two slain officers, including Ramos’s plans to become a chaplain. To get a better feel for who Ramos was and why he was drawn to ministry, we talked to Marcos Miranda, president of the New York State Chaplain Task Force, who oversaw Ramos’s chaplain-training program.

How did you meet Rafael Ramos and what was he like?

Officer Rafael Ramos came to our intensive community crisis chaplain-training program Continue reading →

Why Religious Colleges Should Worry About This New Ruling | First Things | Mark Bauerlein

First ThingsLast month, the National Labor Relations Board issued an important ruling that promises to land in the courts. The ensuing decision may be as momentous as the Yeshiva case of 1980, which determined that tenured and tenure-track faculty members have managerial status and cannot unionize. The new ruling opens the way for more professors in post-secondary institutions to unionize, including religious schools.

Administrators are wondering what it portends, particularly whether it means a more troublesome faculty work force. But those at religious might also ask a policy question: Should they have allowed professors to work at their institution in complete independence of the religious identity of the school? Continue reading →

AP Publishes Fair Article On Ark Encounter and State Controversy | Around the World with Ken Ham

Ken HamI was pleased to read an article today by the news service The Associated Press that was quite fair in how the reporter summarized the struggle between our Ark Encounter project and the State of the Kentucky over the state’s denial of a future sales tax rebate for the Ark. The state has told us that the Ark must open hiring to anyone and that we are too religious.

Instead of rehashing the usual sound bites coming out of the atheist/secularist propaganda machine that has been disseminating so much false and misleading information about the Ark (which appear in many media reports), this AP reporter took a balanced approach—and even talked to a law professor in Kentucky about the legality of the state’s denial. Continue reading →

Interracial marriage and the gospel | ERLC.com

ERLC-Final-Mark-crop3NOTE: The 2015 ERLC Leadership Summit will address “The Gospel and Racial Reconciliation” to equip Christians to apply the gospel on these issues with convictional kindness in their communities, their families, and their churches. This event will be held in Nashville on March 26-27, 2015. To learn more go here.

Trillia and Thern Newbell share how their interracial marriage points to the beauty of the gospel.

Trillia is serves as the Consultant for Women’s Initiatives. She has a degree in political science from the University of Tennessee and is an author and freelance journalist. She is a contributor to the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, Desiring God, and The Gospel Coalition. Continue reading →